The Commander

  • Welcome back Centurions! Come back soon for updates on everything UC High!

  • Do you have anything to complain about? Submit a "Letter to the Editor"

Point: Which is Better for Student Achievement: Charter or Public School?

Back to Article
Back to Article

Point: Which is Better for Student Achievement: Charter or Public School?

artwork by: Owen Megura

artwork by: Owen Megura

artwork by: Owen Megura

Elaina Martin, Opinions Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






   In this modern age, so much stress is placed on kids to do well and study hard. Unfortunately, learning isn’t a one-size-fits-all experience. That’s where charter schools come in. Tailored to the student’s specific needs, NPR explained  that charter schools are independently run organizations funded by much of the same means as public schools (npr.com).

   Not quite private and not quite public, charter schools run a limbo in which they operate under public funds and adhere to district guidelines, while writing their own special learning contracts, or charters. They can’t discriminate against applicants like private schools can, but often require that potential students fill out an application prior to enrollment. According to a national website about charter schools, they are able to manipulate classrooms to fit individual students’ needs (publiccharters.org).

   The benefits of charter schools are evident: according to a government educational website, charter schools typically function the same as public schools, with the upper seventeen percent doing better academically (2.ed.gov). According to the National Charter School Resource Center (NCSRC), “The public charter school sector has demonstrated great potential to create safe, caring, and orderly schools that have good reason to be proud of the academic growth of their students” (charterschoolcenter.ed.gov).

    Charter schools create tailored environments, allowing each student to reach their full potential through many different means. This learning experience isn’t readily available in public schools, making charters the better option for individual student growth.

  Charter schools tout many of the same benefits of private school: personalized learning experiences, engaging classrooms, and a necessary application to attend. However, charter schools are completely free and accessible to anyone who wants to apply, proving that any family can access a better education for their kids. Private schools can also project feelings of superiority and privilege, which can be detrimental to some students. Since charter schools are free, they provide an equal experience to all students and project a feeling of togetherness, as everyone can feel like they belong there (charterschoolcenter.ed.gov).

   Finally, charter schools provide a safe haven for kids suffering from anxiety in traditional schools. Often, traditional schools have too many students and not enough support to look out for struggling kids. Charter schools can provide a better, more relaxed environment for studies. Former UC High Student Bridget Cass, who switched to a charter school, said, “I feel like I’m able to learn a lot better… I can focus on my schoolwork and get extra help from teachers if necessary.” According to The New York Times, charter schools are able to provide better support to their kids because the kids who applied are there to learn (nytimes.com).

   Charter schools are slowly gaining more traction in the modern education system and rightly so. It’s time for a change: traditional schooling is often outdated and unable to meet students’ specific needs. Charter schools provide a good education to every type of student out there, while being a feasible option for most families.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
Navigate Right
The news site of University City High School
Point: Which is Better for Student Achievement: Charter or Public School?