Vaccinations Paramount to Citizen Health and Well-being

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Vaccinations Paramount to Citizen Health and Well-being

Michael Pruchanskiy

Michael Pruchanskiy

Michael Pruchanskiy

Owen Megura, Staff Writer

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    Why should someone be denied medicine that could save them from a lethal and lasting disease? Vaccines are essential for a child’s well-being and parents need to take heed.

   The main reason why parents deny their children vaccination treatment is fear. This fear stems from a false report published in the 1990s that linked a mercury-based product found in some vaccinations with children who were autistic, according to a website about the history of vaccinations (historyofvaccines.org). According to the Center for Disease Control, there have been numerous studies that have shown this claim and the research to be completely unfounded (cdc.org).

   Because the symptoms of autism begin to become noticeable between the ages of one and two years of age, though, some parents of autistic children latched on to this idea and have perpetuated the rumors and fear (autismcenter.org). Because there is not a link between the two, parents must educate themselves on the issue and vaccinate their children in order to exterminate other vaccine-preventable diseases.

   According to a website that distributes information about controversial issues, vaccines are 90-99 percent effective in preventing disease, saving about 2.5 million children a year. As a result of vaccination, about 332 million children were prevented from contracting various diseases from 1994 to 2014. The rate of childhood death from measles was decreased by 74 percent as a result of vaccinations. That is why it is necessary to vaccinate a child, as it is important to keep these diseases from returning (procon.org).

   “Vaccines aren’t meant to hurt children, but benefit them,” stated Junior Ian Tom. “I have received the tetanus, flu, and Hepatitis vaccines, just to name a few.” According to the same website about the positive and negatives of controversial issues, the rate of childhood mortality decreased as well with other diseases’ occurrences, such as smallpox, polio and whooping cough, proving vaccinations have also prevented those deadly diseases from arising in this generation of children. It is therefore essential for parents to vaccinate their children in order to diminish the risk of these vaccine-preventable diseases (procon.org).

   There are a lot of financial benefits to vaccines, as the process of vaccinating a child is much cheaper than not vaccinating them at all, writes the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Children with vaccine-preventable diseases cause financial issues because the medical treatment is expensive. In some cases, it can also cause parents to have to take time off work, which makes it difficult to earn money. That’s why it’s essential to vaccinate children in order to avoid the financial trouble if they become sick (hhs.gov).

   The cost of getting a child vaccinated varies, but most of the time the vaccine is covered by insurance for little or no cost at all. There are also programs for low-income families that can pay for the vaccinations, including a federally-funded program called The Vaccines for Children Program. It is essential to vaccinate a child when there are multiple programs to assist with vaccination payments. Money is not an excuse (vaccines.gov).

   In the spring of 2004, University of Kansas College Student Andy Marso was diagnosed with meningitis, an infection that targets the brain and the spinal cord, according to the Minnesota Department of Health. As a result of having not been vaccinated, Marso ended up losing parts of his right and left foot as well as some of his fingers during treatment. During treatment, Marso experienced pain equivalent to third-degree burns and was in rehabilitation for a year after he was diagnosed. Andy is one of the many who survived the disease and currently encourages immunization in order to prevent others from the pain he had to endure. Parents need to vaccinate their children in order to avoid consequences similar to Marso (health.state.mn.us).

    According to a website about the history of vaccines, scientists are working for the eradication of vaccine-preventable diseases. This includes the likes of polio, mumps, and malaria. Smallpox has already been eradicated, as the last case was located in Somalia in 1977. Scientists were able to terminate this disease because it only spreads through human contact, and cannot be spread through animal contact. Vaccinations are imperative for the common good of our generation and our children’s generation, and parents have to take part in the eradication of these life-threatening diseases by vaccinating their children (historyofvaccines.org).

    Therefore, vaccinations are essential for the overall health of the human population. Vaccinations have been proven time and time again to be a much more effective alternative than avoiding them altogether. All parents should vaccinate their children in order to prevent any lifetime disabilities or other fatal injuries.

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