California Residents Pass Five of Eleven Midterm Propositions

Jeffery Engleman, Staff Writer

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   On November 6, California voters took part in the Midterm Election and voted on a total of 11 propositions that could have major, lasting effects on the state legislation.

    According to ABC7, in total, six of these (laws) passed and five failed (abc7.com).

   According to the Encyclopedia of American Politics, one proposition, which proposed dividing California into three states, was blocked by the Supreme Court and was not put on the ballot (ballotpedia.org).

   Three propositions — the Two-Thirds Vote for State and Local Revenue Increases Initiative, the Consumer Personal Information Disclosure and Sale Initiative, and the Home and School Remediation Bond and Remove Status of Lead Paint as Public Nuisance Initiative — were withdrawn, despite the fact that they gained enough signatures to appear on the ballot (ballotpedia.org).

   Among the propositions that passed was Proposition 7 or the Permanent Daylight Saving Time Measure. According to the Official Voter Information Guide, “Proposition 7 …permits the Legislature by two-thirds vote to make future changes to California’s daylight saving time period, including for its year-round application, if changes are consistent with federal law” (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   According to the Official Voter Information Guide, supporters of Proposition 7 argued that bi-annual changes to the time are hazardous to the health of the general public. Those opposed to the proposition brought up the fact that a permanent Daylight Savings would shift the daylight hours putting us “out of sync” with the neighboring states (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   Proposition 4 was one of the six propositions that passed. According to the Encyclopedia of American Politics, “Proposition 4 or the Children’s Hospital Bonds Initiative… would issue $1.5 billion in bonds for children’s hospitals” (ballotpedia.org).

   According to the Official Voter Information Guide, supporters argued that this proposition would help children’s hospitals that treat serious illnesses such as leukemia, increases capacity, as well as allow these hospitals to use all of the latest technology for treatment. Those opposed to the proposition argued the fact these bonds would have to be repaid with interest and would call for better, big-picture solutions (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   Another proposition that passed was Proposition 1 or the Housing Programs and Veterans’ Loans Bond. The Official Voter Information Guide, “Proposition 1 …authorized four billion dollars in general obligation bonds for existing affordable housing programs for low-income residents” (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

  According to the Official Voter Information Guide, “Proposition 1… would lead to the creation of affordable housing for veterans, working families, seniors, people with disabilities and Californians experiencing homelessness from California’s severe housing crisis.” Those opposed to Proposition 1 argued that it would not do enough to solve California’s housing crisis and further action would be required (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   According to a website about fine drinking and dining, “Proposition 12 requires all eggs sold in California to be produced by cage-free hens by 2022… and sets a new minimum cage size requirements for breeding pigs and calves raised for veal that are sold in California” (eater.com).

   According to the Encyclopedia of American Politics, supporters of the proposition argued that it would help reduce animal cruelty, as well as increase food sanitation. Those opposed to the proposition argued that it was misleading, and that it would actually reduce the space allowed per animal on farms (ballotpedia.org).   

   One Proposition that did not pass, however, was Proposition 8 or the Limits on Dialysis Clinics’ Revenue and Required Refunds Initiative. The Encyclopedia of American Politics states, “Proposition 8 …requires dialysis clinics to issue refunds for revenue above a certain amount” (ballotpedia.org).

   According to the Official Voter Information Guide, those supporting Proposition 8 argued that it would increase the quality of patient care, and reduce the amount of overcharging done by dialysis corporations. Those opposed to the proposition speculate that many dialysis clinics would have to close if this measure came into effect (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   Proposition 11 or the Ambulance Employees Paid On-Call Breaks, Training, and Mental Health Services Initiative also passed. According to the Encyclopedia of American Politics, “Proposition 11 allows ambulance providers to require workers to remain on call during breaks paid. [It]..ensures EMTs and paramedics are paid to be reachable during breaks to save lives” (ballotpedia.org).

    This proposition was supported by Californians for Emergency Preparedness and Safety (ballotpedia.org).

   Proposition 2 was another ballot measure that passed. According to the Encyclopedia of American Politics, “Proposition 2 or the Use Millionaire’s Tax Revenue for Homelessness Prevention Housing Bonds Measure authorizes [California] to use revenue from millionaire’s tax for two billion dollars in bonds for homelessness prevention housing” (ballotpedia.org).

   According to the Official Voter Information Guide, those in support of the measure argued that this would help keep homeless and mentally disabled people off of the street. Those against the measure argued that it was counterproductive, because it took funds away from another service designed to help the severely mentally disabled, stated the Official Voter Information Guide (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   Proposition 3 or the California Water Infrastructure and Watershed Conservation Bond Initiative was one of the measures rejected by the voters of California. According to the Official Voter Information Guide, if this proposition passed, California would take out roughly nine billion dollars in general obligation bonds to fund projects that are supposed to help increase clean water in California (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

   Those in agreement with Proposition 3 argued that it would help provide clean water for California, which is in a drought, while opposing voters argued that it only gives money to corporations, and that many propositions  similar to this one have been proposed before, none of which has had a positive impact (ballotpedia.org).

   Proposition 6 or the Voter Approval for Future Gas and Vehicle Taxes and 2017 Tax Repeal Initiative had also failed to pass. According to the Encyclopedia of American Politics, if it had passed, it would have repealed the 2017 gas tax, and forced any future vehicle fee increases to be subject to vote (ballotpedia.org).

   According to the Official Voter Information Guide, those supporting stated that it would lower gas prices for Californians, while those against criticized the fact that this tax funds local transportation, which means that taking it away would reduce spending on bridges and roads by five billion dollars annually (voterguide.sos.ca.gov).

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