San Diego Mid-Coast Trolley to Benefit Students

Construction for The San Diego Mid-Coast Trolley off the 5 Freeway on La Jolla Colony Drive.

Kyla Esquivel

Construction for The San Diego Mid-Coast Trolley off the 5 Freeway on La Jolla Colony Drive.

Luke Minnick, Staff Writer

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   The San Diego Mid-Coast Trolley will extend from Santa Fe Depot Downtown to University City’s major centers including UC San Diego and Westfield UTC, and will cost 2.1 billion dollars when finished.

   According to a website about transportation in San Diego, the construction began in fall of 2016 and is set to open fall of 2021. This form of public transportation is meant to serve as an effective alternative to the congested freeways and roadways (keepsandiegomoving.com).

   According to the San Diego Union Tribune, buildings are being constructed in University City every day, including the renovation of UTC Mall, Costa Verde, and other nearby housing locations. To accommodate all the new business, the UTC trolley stop is meant to be a way to get people around and dilute the traffic situation (sandiegouniontribune.com).

   Since the UTC Trolley stop is within walking distance from UC High, it will be a useful option for students and staff to take into consideration. English Teacher Matt Moody stated, “My plan is to take the trolley from the Euclid stop all the way to the UTC stop, then take the same route home to avoid traffic.” Moody explained that  the trolley will benefit local businesses too, bringing in people and more money.

   Students from all around San Diego including Clairemont, La Mesa, North Park, Downtown, and Balboa can take this form of transportation (keepsandiegomoving.com).

   The trolley can help the people of University City and will give local businesses more freedom to upgrade, redesign, or fully remodel the local restaurants that many people love (sandiegouniontribune.com).

   The new trolley system can give the UC High community a chance to be part of the reduction of fossil fuels and experience rail travel. The American Public Transportation Association Website says, “Public transportation use in the United States reduces our nation’s carbon emissions by 37 million metric tons” (apta.com).   

  According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration, “Carbon dioxide makes up 95% of all transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions. Cars, SUVs, and pickup trucks running on conventional gasoline, diesel, and other fuels emit carbon dioxide. Combined, these vehicles account for roughly two-thirds of transportation-related emissions, ranking transportation as the second largest source of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation will likely require a broad range of strategies, including increasing vehicle efficiency, lowering the carbon content of fuels, and reducing vehicle miles of travel. Public transportation can be one part of the solution” (transit.dot.gov).

   The San Diego Mid-Coast Trolley will not only help the environment, but will also help the economy. According to a website on transit benefits, investment in public transportation creates jobs, provides access to jobs, revitalizes business districts and neighborhoods, enables employers to tap a larger workforce, boosts commerce, and saves money on infrastructure costs for taxpayers (voicesforpublictransportation.org).

   According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, “Foot traffic in the area will likely increase as a result, supporting new restaurants and nightlife.” The reported added,  “University City is growing at an astonishing rate — from the 2.1 billion dollars Mid-Coast Trolley extension to massive expansions by UC San Diego and the Westfield UTC mall” (sandiegouniontribune.com).

   “It will lessen traffic in the area because people will choose public transit instead of cluttering the already busy streets, like Genesee,” stated Moody.

  This could reduce traffic not only on Genesee, but the 805 and 5 freeways, and Nobel Dr (keepsandiegomoving.com).

   According to The American Public Transportation Association, “Public transportation use saved 865 million hours in travel time and 450 million gallons of fuel in 498 urban areas” (apta.com).

   According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, “Foot traffic in the area will likely increase as a result, supporting new restaurants and nightlife.” The reported added,  “University City is growing at an astonishing rate — from the 2.1 billion dollars Mid-Coast Trolley extension to massive expansions by UC San Diego and the Westfield UTC mall” (sandiegouniontribune.com).

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